(THE WASHINGTON POST) Can Shane Claiborne’s progressive version of evangelical Christianity catch on with a new generation?

In 2007, he and Campolo launched an organization called Red Letter Christians to connect like-minded communities in a networkIt now encompasses about 120 church congregations and other groups, including one in Chile and several in Europe, with plans to launch in more countries this year.

(KOIN) Portland faith leaders rally against Trump, war

Leaders from various faith groups held a rally in Portland Monday united in their opposition to President Trump’s policies in the Middle East and against any war. The 6 p.m. rally with Faith in Public Life, Red Letter Christians and others from different faiths included a candlelight vigil at All Saints Episcopal Church, 4033 SE Woodstock. Organizers said this was part of a nationwide effort, with other similar events near the White House and in New York.

(THE CHRISTIAN POST) Red Letter Christians mark Sunday as national day of prayer for Trump impeachment inquiry

A nondenominational group of liberal believers who call themselves the Red Letter Christians — because they are committed to “doing what Jesus said” printed in red font in many Bibles — will hold a national day of prayer Sunday in support of the impeachment inquiry of President Donald Trump and are calling on other believers to join them.

(THE HILL) More than 100 Christian leaders sign statement supporting impeachment inquiry

The Red Letter Christians, a justice-focused movement, initiated the petition after hosting a revival last weekend in Goldsboro, N.C., according to the group’s website. The statement calls for Christian leaders to support the impeachment inquiry launched in Congress last month.

(HUFFINGTON POST) Christians Plan National Day Of Prayer To Support Trump Impeachment Inquiry

The idea for a national day of prayer arose organically last week at a Red Letter Revival event in Goldsboro, North Carolina, according to Rev. Peter G. Heltzel, a professor at New York Theological Seminary who helped put together the letter. Heltzel said that attendees at the social justice-focused event, which was planned as a counter-rally to the Greenville stop on Graham’s “Decision America” tour, were appalled by the “hypocrisy of the religious right” on the impeachment issue.

(THE DALLAS MORNING NEWS) A distorted brand of evangelical Christianity created our political crisis, and it's time for revival

The Revs. William Barber, Jacqui Lewis, Tony Campolo and more than a dozen other preachers from the Red Letter Christians movement will join the Rev. Freddy Haynes at St. Luke Community United Methodist Church in Dallas for a revival. Red Letter Christianity seeks to restore the words and way of Jesus to the heart of our evangelical witness.

(THE DALLAS OBSERVER) Dallas In For a Different Kind of Revival This Weekend

For the Red Letter Christians, a group started a decade ago by sociologist and pastor Tony Campolo, following Jesus means aggressively promoting social justice for all people, rather than doggedly pursuing political power, as many members of the Christian right have done since the 1970s and ’80s, says Don Golden, the executive director of the group.

(THE GUARDIAN) 'Our faith compels us': Christian resistance to Trump gathers steam

Claiborne and other members of the organisation were holding a revival meeting in Lynchburg to protest at “toxic Christianity” and the “gospel of Trump”, and promote biblical commands to protect the poor and vulnerable. Another Red Letter Revival is planned for Dallas next month.

(NPR) Christian Group Calls Out Fellow Evangelicals Who Have Embraced Trump

Among those who disagree with Sessions are a small group of evangelicals known as Red Letter Christians. They eschew politics altogether, saying they choose instead to follow Jesus’ teachings: feeding the poor, sheltering immigrants and tending to the sick.

(THE NEW YORK TIMES) ‘This Is Not of God’: When Anti-Trump Evangelicals Confront Their Brethren

“Let’s go where the Christians are, go where toxic Christianity lives,” Mr. Claiborne said last year, when proposing the idea for a revival in Lynchburg at an annual retreat for the Red Letter Christians. The revival last month was the most energetic of several recent attempts by Christians in various camps to confront what they see as Mr. Trump’s “court evangelicals” selling out the faith.

(MOTHER JONES) I Went to an Evangelical Revival and It Was All About Fighting Racism and Protecting LGBT Rights

Say the word “evangelical,” and images of diversity or progressive politics are not likely to come to mind. But at the E.C. Glass High School auditorium in Lynchburg, Virginia, that’s exactly what was on display in April at the first Red Letter revival. A mix of pop and contemporary Christian music plays from the speakers as trendy young people, white-haired couples, and black, white, biracial, and Latino evangelicals greet friends and find their seats for the first day of a weekend-long religious revival.

(VOX) For many, Christianity and Trumpism are synonymous. These evangelicals are pushing back.

Featuring a Native American prayer for the land, a Christian rapper who presented a prayer in poetry, and an openly bisexual speaker, the Red Letter Revival was diverse (only two of 18 presenters were white men) and passionately political. Its speakers repudiated what Pastor David Anderson called “evangelicals … more committed to the amendments than to the commandments.”

(RELIGION NEWS SERVICE) At 'Red Letter Revival,' leaders give voice to evangelicals on the margins

Despite the rhetoric against Falwell, author and revival organizer Shane Claiborne said the Red Letter Revival was not designed  to “vilify” him, saying “we’re not here to protest, we’re here to pro-testify!”